Tag Archives: psychology

Scientology Beliefs (revised)

In plain English, here are scientology’s core religious beliefs.

  1. Scientology’s sophisticated mix of pop psychology and hypnotism are firmly believed to be the only workable ‘technology’ for curing mental issues, neurosis, psychosis, physical disease, increasing awareness and intelligence, and for creating OT’s (operating thetans, L. Ron Hubbard’s version of Nietzsche’s superman or Aleister Crowley’s magician).Note:  Scientology is at first presented in secular, scientific terms promising and then false reporting 100% workability.  In fact scientology never achieved even the scientifically recognized 20 to 30 percent placebo effect in terms of long-term satisfaction.  In order to explain away that discrepancy the less-than-placebo percentage who stick with it are led to adopt the remaining listed beliefs.  The ‘technology’ evolved being carefully designed and administered so as to lead scientologists to wholeheartedly accept and live according to these beliefs.

2.  Planet Earth is a prison. The vast majority of human beings – and billions of             invisible other beings – are its inmates.

3.  Xenu is the name of scientology’s Satan who established Earth as                                  a prison and transported billions of beings to serve as its inmates.

4.  Our continued imprisonment is assured by ‘psychs.’ ‘Psychs’ are                                    defined as psychiatrists, psychologists, psycho-therapists, priests,                                ministers, and anyone else practicing in the field of the mind and                                  spirit.  Psychs were sent here from a planet called ‘Farsec.’  They are a                        special breed of being created and invested with the sole purpose of                            keeping humankind mentally imprisoned.

5.  Ron Hubbard is the first to discover the above ‘truths’, and the only                             one to have devised a means of escaping the prison planet.

6.  Navigation through the only hole in the wall consists of closely                                        emulating Hubbard and behaving as he did when he lived.

7.  Enemies, including psychs as well as anyone expressing any doubt or                           reservation about these beliefs, must be destroyed by any means                                  necessary by scientologists. Such means include lying, suing, cheating,                        harassing, intimidating, blackmailing, smearing and by physical                                      violence.

8. When a scientologist has expended all of his best efforts in the vain                             pursuit of these beliefs he is expected to ‘discard’ his body so that he                           may continue to pursue them without such a physical ‘impediment’.

Whether the ultimate belief, number 8 above, constitutes suicide is a wholly subjective question of religious belief.

Scientology Thought Control

The following is a chapter passage that immediately follows another one that was posted earlier, Deconstructing Scientology.  A quick reminder perusal of the first passage will make reading the following easier.

Part II:

Such a psychotherapy has been shown to have the power to convert conscientious, caring, emotionally disturbed, and relatively intelligent people into cheery, focused followers who yet accept implicitly, and act according to, subconscious commands on the order of:

A. One should never fear to hurt another person in a just cause (most particularly when that cause is the cause of the creator of the mental therapy he engages in).

B. One should never withdraw his allegiance to any group to which he has pledged it, irrespective of how criminal and destructive he discovers that group might be (most particularly when that group is the one endowed with a monopoly on the mental therapy he is engaged in).

C. One should never show compassion to the weak for to do so will worsen the weak and the strong attempting to lend a hand. Only the ‘able’ ought be supported and assisted. Like in social Darwinist thought it is justified by the arbitrary datum that only further empowerment of the elite will raise anyone else’s boat.

D. That now considering oneself one of the elite, every time you engage in self-absorbed, introspective processes to make yourself feel better you are improving humankind’s lot. A sort of imbued megalomaniac narcissism is effectuated re-enforcing a-c above.

E. Personalities inclined to not go along with the mental therapy program and instead find fault with it ought to be disposed of permanently and with no slightest dent in one’s conscience for having done so.

The thinking becomes so inverted that the mental health therapy acolyte becomes fiercely contentious and combative about arguing the rationality of the a-e thought pattern and behaviors above.  In fact, this is the ingrained mindset and behavior pattern of a scientologist; and he or she will defend it as ferociously and instinctively as a she-gator protects her young.  Being utterly oblivious to any sub conscious (associative) mind system in himself the scientologist may even purport not to hold these views and yet continue to argue vehemently for their rationale.  Even when scientologists leave and disavow the organizations and the subject itself, they can be observed continuing to act out these patterns.  Little compassion and much arrogant, vicious fault-finding and attempts to undermine espousers of opposing views often marks the interchange between them.

That people can have their characters and long term behavior patterns so apparently permanently molded and that they can continue to argue the virtues of their programming ought not come as a surprise.  Many scientifically grounded studies over the past several decades in fact have demonstrated that that is precisely how sub conscious (associative) and analytical thought works hand in glove.  The subconscious (associative) mind system automatically rationalizes the content of its adopted narratives perpetuating the human proclivity toward creating, adopting and bolstering stories to make sense of the world.  Those rationalizations become somewhat permanent associative mind narratives.  The narratives’ matrices of associated ‘facts’ become the filter through which new information and perceptions are sensed and organized. The auto-associating mind system prompts the individual to use his analytical faculties to further explain and justify its conclusions.  The comfortable, if lazy, analytical function usually complies or simply abides and articulates the sub-conscious-associative faculty’s conclusions.  It most certainly does so when the individual is not on guard against misinformation, mis-association and irrationality common to associative mind processes.  And when the person is convinced that there are no such processes present – as the ‘cleared’ scientologist is – his analytical system can become mighty reactionary itself.

Many of these facts about how the mind works are understood and plied by those who mold educational, political and social thought.  This knowledge is used and affects us daily in advertising, business, law, politics, media, you name it.  Arts and sciences driven by it are increasing exponentially with the advent of the Age of Information.  Fantastic sums of money are invested into utilizing this knowledge to maintain the status quo and make populations more materialist-consumerist oriented to increase the dollars flowing toward the top of the wealth pyramid. Like it or not, we live in a culture driven, fueled, and maintained by consultation to and application of the advices of the greatest minds in human psychology.

The knowledge utilized to keep the masses slaves to the current economic system demonstrates how an understanding of these mechanisms could make a hypnotic ‘therapy’ as discussed herein possible.  They are the very mechanisms used to make scientologists slaves to their leadership.  The scientologist is kept oblivious to this.  Scientology keeps its followers ignorant by clever application of a-e above.  It teaches them that those who know anything about psychology are the enemy and that understanding what the enemy knows could poison the follower.  The enemy and his knowledge must be attacked and destroyed by any means necessary in order for a-e culture to function.  And so scientology ultimately becomes an insulated cult playing out an exaggerated form of that which it is taught to condemn.

In practice this is how scientology culture operates.  Its form of governance is closed-system, thought-controlling totalitarianism.  It closely resembles George Orwell’s 1984.  That holds parallel right down to omnipresent electronic recording, thought police, thought crimes, and Newspeak.   If a scientologist begins to cultivate thought patterns that question authority (or even explore the very mechanisms we discuss here) they are soon ferreted out by liberal use of one component of a lie detector (the electropsychometer or e-meter).  The discovered offending mind is put through rigorous reformation techniques.  That reform can include years-long confinement in re-educating concentration camps. It more often entails the loss – or threatened loss – of communication and communion with one’s family and closest friends and even business associates.

It should be noted that the psychological mechanisms at work in commerce, marketing, media and politics are not held secret.  The only reason for their continued negative effectiveness is people’s lack of energy or curiosity in learning of them.  And therein lies the most troubling aspect of scientology’s enforced information bubble.

It would seem that the road to recovery for a scientologist should include education in the very psychological mechanisms that were employed on him so effectively that they often continue to affect him long after he has left the cult.

Scientology Inc. versus the Psychs

L. Ron Hubbard was clearly not keen on the subject of psychiatry.

But, it wasn’t always that way.   In the late forties and early fifties Hubbard put a lot of effort into selling the psychiatric profession on the virtues of Dianetics.  In response, he was not only rebuffed but targeted by a well- financed campaign directed by the “very best” psychiatrists to expose Hubbard and Dianetics as  alleged frauds.  That campaign gained momentum for a couple of decades as it was joined along the way by numerous Federal and State agencies.

Increasingly, Hubbard fought escalating fire with escalating fire.  He gradually came off his original, soft conclusion from his first book, Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health, that psychiatrists and psychologists did not achieve results mainly because they did not possess a workable mental technology.  In the early fifties he often poked fun at the unworkability of psychiatry, psychology  and psycho-analysis (their practioners collectively referred to as ‘psychs’ in Scientology) in his lectures. Then he began to deride mental health professionals as working not to help humankind but instead to control it. His position, while stated with increasing vehemence that betrayed a personal hurt at being attacked instead of recognized by the mental health establishment, was not without support.   A four-part BBC documentary, Century of Self (available for free at freedocumentaries.com), though evidencing no connection with Scientology or Hubbard, very competently sums up the valid criticisms Hubbard had been levying for decades prior to its making and airing. It documents the primary use of mental health methodologies for controlling populaces rather than in improving or curing them.

By the mid sixties the organized psychiatric and psychological associations’ attacks were so effective, Scientology was in danger of being banned in every country it had been established in across the globe.  Hubbard took off the gloves.   He created an international intelligence and propaganda network, the Guardian’s Office, and directed it to infiltrate, expose and destroy the major national and international mental health associations attacking Scientology.  So hard-hitting and dedicated were church campaigns against psychiatric associations and front groups in the sixties and seventies that Scientology survived attacks that no other organization likely would have.

By the time I took charge of church external affairs in the early eighties, there were few organized psychiatric attacks extant on Scientology.  There were a handful of expert psychiatric witnesses in damages cases against Scientology just as there were in any other lawsuit dealing with issues of emotional distress.  But the behemoth organizations Hubbard confronted and combatted (American Psychiatric Association/American Psychological Association) were no longer a factor in attacks on Scientology.

Ironically, it was after he had won the war against organized psychiatry that Hubbard issued his final salvos against it that would justify his successors tilting against psychiatric windmills as a matter of religious conviction for the next thirty years.  From the isolation of the seclusion he imposed upon himself for the final five years of his life, in 1982 Hubbard pronounced as a matter of church policy and doctrine that psychiatrists constituted a special, identifiable type of evil spirit.  That is, no person within the ranks of psychiatry or psychology was anymore simply a person who wanted to help others but was misguided into unworkable fields. Instead, psychiatrists and psychologists were a special breed of being who had been psychiatrists lifetime after lifetime, for millions of years, and were programmed to create chaos and destruction to earth.  His final pronouncement on the subject directly contradicted and tore the heart out of essential basics of the philosophy he had created over three decades in that it adjudicated a class of people as inherently evil. Hubbard pronounced that the sole cause of crime on earth was psychiatrists – “There’s only one remedy for crime – get rid of the psychs.  They are causing it!”  Perhaps by the time we move up to May 1982 (when Hubbard published this anti-psych tract) in the larger narrative of Scientology’s history we’ll better understand Hubbard’s level of vehemence during that particular period of time.

Such context will no doubt be suppressed among corporate Scientologists.  The truth might slow the momentum of a very lucrative con built on Scientologists’ fear of ‘psychs.’ The church has raised hundreds of millions of dollars from spirited annual rallies condemning psychiatry and calling for the “obliteration” of ‘psychs’ as a duty dictated by religious faith. In the year 2011 corporate Scientology leader David Miscavige announced “Global Vengeance” campaigns against “psychiatry”, receiving wildly enthusiastic ovations from his core contributors.

One highlight of that presentation that ignited a particularly raucous response was the announcement that the annual American Psychiatric Association convention that year had featured a seminar organized to try to figure out why Scientology was waging war against psychiatry.  Miscavige was clearly tickled when disclosing this tidbit to the crowd.  In fact, he was giddy in his dandy, tailor-made tuxedo standing behind his elaborate, custom-made podium.

It made me consider the irony that the head of the American Psychiatric Association probably understood the cross L. Ron Hubbard’s had once borne better than Miscavige ever would.  After all, he was in nearly the same position Hubbard found himself in sixty years earlier when he no doubt perplexedly pondered , ‘why on earth has organized psychiatry decided to wage war against me and Scientology?’